New Cochrane Systematic Review: Continuous chest compression versus interrupted chest compression for cardiopulmonary resuscitation of non-asphyxial out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Key results:

“When CPR was performed by bystanders, we found that more people survived until discharge from hospital after chest compression alone than they did following interrupted chest compression with pauses at a fixed ratio for rescue breathing (15 compressions to 2 breaths) (14% versus 11.6%). For the outcomes of survival to hospital admission and neurological outcomes, we did not have sufficient data to be certain that either strategy was better. No data was available for adverse effects, quality of life or survival at one-year.

When CPR was performed by EMS professionals, we found that survival to hospital discharge was slightly lower with continuous chest compressions (100/minute) plus asynchronous rescue breathing (10/minutes) CPR compared with interrupted chest compression plus rescue breathing. Around 9.7% of people lived when they received interrupted chest compression plus rescue breathing compared with 9% of people who received continuous chest compression plus asynchronous rescue breathing.

The number of people who survived to hospital admission was slightly higher in those treated with interrupted chest compression plus rescue breathing compared with continuous chest compression plus asynchronous rescue breathing (25.9% versus 24.6%). There was little or no difference in neurological outcomes. The proportion of people who experienced adverse events was probably similar with 55.4% people treated with interrupted chest compression plus rescue breathing experiencing an adverse event compared with 54.4% in those treated with continuous chest compression asynchronous rescue breathing.”

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